Remembering A Legend…THE BANDMASTER.

One year ago, we  lost an icon in our city.

Someone who touched the lives of thousands and changed the climate of our culture that is Mardi Gras.

A man so loved and respected not only by this city but, the entire region…the entire nation.

Today, I am honoring the legendary Mr. Edwin Harrell Hampton who passed away one year ago (July 21st.)

Mr. Hampton mentored thousands of musicians over the course of his 50+-year career leading the legendary “Marching 100.”

Arriving at St. Augustine High School in 1952, Mr. Hampton immediately set about starting what would become a world-renowned and hugely influential marching band, which he continued to direct until his retirement after Hurricane Katrina.

We love you Hamp…we miss you. Calling out my Purple Knights, I know you’re hereshow ’em the love.


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14 thoughts on “Remembering A Legend…THE BANDMASTER.

  1. I, WE , miss Hamp greatly!!! He was a treasure at St.Aug and to the entire city of NOLA. Even though I was not a member of the band, spent my extra curricula time in SGA and Speech and Debate, Mr. Hamp still had a great effect on all of us Purple Knights. Again we sorely miss the GREAT MAN !! the Bandmaster and Mentor. Dayum Hamp we miss you ;but knowing that you are probably leading the angelic band gives us solace. The legacy YOU left at St.Aug will endure as a tribute to you!!!

  2. I found your link on facebook, what a wonderful tribute to a magnificent man!
    We miss you Hamp!
    St. Augustine c/o’71
    Rise Sons of the Gold and Purple!

  3. And this is a HIGH SCHOOL band? Wow,the drills are tight as ever. They could compete with any college band. I’d heard of this band before but, didn’t really know too much about them. I just knew that, they were highly regarded in your city(and elsewhere). Now, I see why.

  4. Hamp helped shape me into the man I am today. His legacy will live on through those of us who knew him and love him.

    C/O’89…simply divine.

  5. I didn’t go to Aug but, Hamp had an effect on all us in the city. Those of us who didn’t go always wanted to be the band to beat Aug. It made for great competition. We were under Doc Harris at the time and were coming strong, Aug was coming strong.
    Those were some great battles man.

    JFK Alum of ’84

  6. I read about the New Orleans marching bands in Dan Baum’s Nine Lives: One of the figures in the book was director Wilber Rawlins, Jr. I was in band in high school myself, but it was not the kind of extended family that they appear to be in New Orleans. Plus, any city where the high school band’s halftime show is a bigger deal than the football game is o.k. by me. It sounds like Mr Hampton put his mark and more on those values.

    • A funny story. My son (who was in the band) and his friend (who was a football player) were in the mall with me. I ran across a friend of mine who was with her daughter. My friend asked the guys what school they went to (both went to Aug), his friendly said “I play on the football team. ” My son said, “I’m in the band.”
      Her daughter looked at my son and said…”YOU’RE IN THE BAND?!!”
      …and so it goes in NOLA. Football..ok but…are you in the band is what young girls wanna know around here!

  7. To my mentor, my teacher, my molder. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to march for you. I reflect, and live by the principals you taught me even today as a successful business owner. You taught me how to prepare, how to practice, how to present, and most importantly how to project myself as a honorable respectful African Amercan. You once told me that “there are ordinary bands, and there are exceptional bands. God never calls us to do ordinary things, he calls us to be exceptional.”

    We love you, thank you for dedicating your life to producing quality young men. We came to St Aug from all over the city and you loved us regardless of the wealth of our families or the complexion of skin. I am very proud to say that I was once a member of the St Aug Marching 100. Thank you

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